May’s rabid bat stats highest in 20 years; Touching a bat could expose you to rabies

Since May 1, four bats found in Washington have tested positive for rabies, the highest number identified in the state in the month of May since 1998. The Washington State Department of Health reminds people to call their local health department if they, a family member or a pet interacts with a bat.

Health officials routinely test for and find rabid bats, typically during the summer months. DOH wants the public to continue to take appropriate precautions if a bat – dead or alive – is found. Try to avoid contact with bats and other wild animals; do not touch a bat if possible. If you do have contact with a bat or suspect that a family member or pet had contact with a bat, b>try to safely capture it and keep it contained away from people and call your local health department for next steps.

It is also important to protect your pets by ensuring their rabies vaccinations are current. More detailed precautions and information can be found on the Washington State Department of Health website.

While any mammal can be infected with the rabies virus, bats are the most common animal in Washington that carry rabies. In 2017, 22 bats were tested and found to have the virus. This is up from 2016 when 20 rabid bats were identified. The Washington State Public Health Laboratories tests between 200 and 300 bats per year. Typically, between three and 10 percent of the bats submitted for testing are found to be rabid.

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1 comment

  • Sandy Strehlou Friday, 01 June 2018 09:42 Comment Link

    It would be helpful to have also had statistics for the prevalence of rabies in bats in the
    San Juans. Our relative isolation may decrease the incident and lesson local fears about bats. I am not suggesting that people should be careless around bats, rather than statistics as they apply to the San Juans would have been helpful. SJI-based Russel Barsh/Kwiaht do bat research. Perhaps they can provide more information.

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